If you are new to tea drinking then you’re method of preparing tea is probably that of dipping a tea bag on a hot water, right?!

In this article we will showcase how to make Chinese tea using a kettle.

There are only a few people in the south that use kettles to boil tea. In the Southwest of China, Tibetans prepare their everyday big Tea or Da Cha by using kettles.

Types of Tea Brewed in Kettles

There are many type of teas that needs to be boiled in order for their flavor fully extracted, which can only be done by putting them inside a kettle.

Some examples of these tea classes are Pu’er and other compressed teas which are the oldest form of teas made in China.

How Should Tea Be Brewed in a Kettle?

The process is not as complicated as you might think.

All you have to do is add water to the kettle, add your tea leaves, boil and drink. Simple as that!

The tea will then be left inside the kettle and will be boiled for as many times as you want.

You don’t have to worry about brewing time, amount of tea leaves or anything.

Simple and straightforward, that is the process of making tea using a kettle.

Why Use a Kettle?

  1. The very first thing that you should know about this process is that it is not a “brewing process”, because the tea is actually boiled. Not just like any other methods, the tea is left inside the kettle for a couple of days.
  2. Those that uses this process don’t mind if the tea is slightly over brewed. Also, as far as my tea knowledge is concerned, overnight tea is unhealthy. But why does Tibetans drink this unhealthy teas and yet manage to live a longer life. According to a 2009 study, life expectancy of Tibetans increased from 35.5 years in 1959 to 67 years today.
  3. Tea that is prepared using a kettle is usually served with bowls. Yes! That little white bowl that you’ve seen in some Chinese movies.

SuYou Cha

SuYou Cha is a specially served Tibetan Tea and it is a must for Tibetans, they must drink this tea during winter. If they are working long days, they tend to drink a few bowls in the morning and start to work until late in the afternoon skipping lunch.

To make SuYou Cha, first you add suyou (a Tibetan version of butter) and sugar ZhenBa (powder made from a highland wheat QingKe) into the bowl. Then add Da Cha, Stir and its done.

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