Chinese Tea – Customs and Traditions

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Chinese tea is present in almost occasion in a Chinese everyday life be it casual occasion, weddings, formal occasions, etc.… it’s as if that tea must be present or the occasion will not be complete.

Below are some interesting Chinese custom and traditions that are worth knowing.

Chinese Tea and Weddings

In a traditional Chinese Wedding, the groom and the bride must serve their parents a cup of tea while kneeling in front of them.

This means that the newlyweds are being grateful to their parents that if they didn’t bring them up as they do, they will likely not be there in front of them.

Chinese Tea and Respect

One way to show the respect of young ones to their seniors is through a cup of tea.

Back in the old days, in a family or an organization, only those in the lower level serve tea to the higher ups.

Nowadays, anyone can serve a cup of tea to anyone.

Parents can serve their kids a cup of tea or a boss serving his or her employee a cup of tea and no one will raise an opinion about it.

But on formal occasions the traditional approach is still the one that is being applied, where an individual will serve the one on much higher rank.

Chinese Tea and Apologies

If you are serious about making amends to the one you have made a mistake with, saying how sorry you are is not enough.

You need to serve that person a tea and apologise.

This act shows submissiveness and regret for the things that you have done.

Chinese Tea and Thank You

You might notice it that some Chinese after someone pours a cup of tea on them they tap their two fingers against the table.

And you are baffled as to why they are doing it.

Could it be that there is something mischievous that’s going on? Well don’t be. It is only their way of saying thank you to the one who serve them a cup of tea.

Tapping Two Fingers

It is said that the custom of tapping two fingers against the table when someone pours you a cup of tea started in Ching Dynasty with Emperor Qian Long.

It is said that in order for the emperor to better serve the needs of his kingdom he always dress casually and visit his kingdom.

A servant which accompanied him must treat him as a normal person in order to avoid revealing his identity.

In one instance, they are in a restaurant, the emperor poured a cup of tea into the servant (which is a huge grace for him) the servant should have kneel down and thank the emperor but since he is afraid that it will reveal the identity of Emperor Qian Long, he tap the table with his two fingers to show his gratitude.

Even now in the modern times, tapping the table against the table when someone pours a cup of tea to you is considered a polite gesture.

By | 2017-07-05T16:23:32+00:00 May 26th, 2016|History, Customs & Traditions|